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Talk To Frank

What Is Talk To Frank?

The campaign against drugs that has the longest duration in the entire UK is Talk to Frank. But has it actually worked and stopped drug use?

Drug education in the UK was changed forever ten years ago when a Swat team raided a quiet suburban kitchen. The doom and gloom teachings coupled with pushing to keep away from the drug pushers who are everywhere was thrown out. A lighter, more humorous approach was used instead.


In the main advertisement, an adolescent kid brings in a police grab squad to capture his mom when she recommends they have a tranquil chat about medications. The message, "Drugs are illegal. Talking about them isn't. So Talk to Frank", was brand new as well.


Frank: Friendly Confidential Drug Advice

Thought up by promotion organization Mother, Frank was, indeed, the new name for the National Drugs Helpline. Young people were meant to feel Frank was a helpful elder brother they could trust and from whom they could seek advice on illegal drugs. In the bid to make the Frank label a very popular one among the young people in the country, programs like the tour round a brain house, and Pablo the canine drugs mule were all incorporated.


According to Justin Tindall, creative director of Leo Burnett ad agency, the most important thing is that no one could accuse frank of trying to be "down with the kids," or coming out with the wrong attire. Even the YouTube videos that spoof Frank are respectful. Also, there's no sign that Frank is a government agent - something that is rare in the history of campaigns paid for by government.

Education about drug has come a long way since Nancy Reagan and the UK cast of Grange Hill told kids to "Just Say No," which a lot of people not believe was completely counterproductive.


Most promotions in Europe now concentrate, similar to Frank, on attempting to give fair-minded data to help youngsters settle on their own choices. You still see pictures of prison bars and upset parents, though, in countries where dealing drugs will get you in serious trouble with the law. A recent campaign launched in Singapore informed young people who visit clubs, "You play, you pay".

In the United States of America, the federal government has spent millions of dollars on a long-running campaign, Above the Influence, that sells positive possibilities to using substances by making use of a combination of funny and cautionary stories. The accentuation is on conversing with youngsters in their own particular dialect - one promotion demonstrates a group of "stoners" marooned on a couch. Around the world, a good number of anti-drug campaigns still use the scare tricks of old, "descent into hell," being one of the most used. The DrugsNot4Me series recently launched a commercial in Canada that shows a beautiful, self-assured young lady metamorphosis after using "drugs" into a shaking, hollow-eyed mess.

A study carried out in the UK on anti-drugs campaign that ran between 1999 and 2004 shows that adverts that portray the negative results of drug use influence vulnerable youth to try out with the drugs.


By demonstrating how the drugs affect the use, giving the highs and lows, Frank was not supported by the Conservative politicians on the new path it had taken.


One primary online promotion educated viewers: "Cocaine makes you feel high and in charge."

Hitting the middle road with an ad to give the right message always proved to be a challenge. The person behind this cocaine ad has said that he now thinks he thought the average person browsing the web had a longer attention span. Some might not have adhered around to the finish of the liveliness to get some answers concerning the negative impacts. The idea behind the ad according to Powell is to make the Frank brand a more honest one by being sincere to teenagers about drugs.

According to the Home Office, up to 67% of teenagers preferred to talk to Frank if drug advice becomes necessary. A total of 225,892 calls were made to the Frank helpline and a total of 3,341,777 visits to the site in 2011/12. It's confirmed, it contends, that the method works.

Though, like with any other anti-drug media campaign around the globe, there's no proof that Frank has stopped people to use substances.

In the years since the campaign started, drug use in the UK is down by 9%; however, experts say this might be because marijuana use has declined, most like due to changing attitudes toward smoking tobacco.


Frank - What Is It?

FRANK is a national drug education program that was established at the Home Office of the British Government and the Department of Health in 2003. It was designed to lower the rate of both legal and illegal drug use by providing education to teenagers and young people about what the effects of using drug and alcohol could be. Several media campaigns on the web and on radio have been put out by this programme.


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Services

FRANK offers the following services for those who are looking for info and/or guidance regarding drugs:

  • A website
  • A confidential telephone number, available 24 hours a day
  • Email
  • An anonymous live chat every afternoon 2-6pm
  • Help in finding a rehab and treatment facility